remote teaching

Teaching Resources

This section of the Teaching @ UCR website will provide information and resources to support faculty with the design and development of remote classrooms. The Exploration Center for Innovative Teaching and Engagement (XCITE) is available to help. For direct assistance, please fill out the support form and someone from XCITE will be in contact with you shortly.

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Getting Started

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Getting Started

Here are some best practices for moving your content from in-person to online. See our list of strategies and tools for more information and links to resources. Creating an online course provides new avenues and technologies for engaging students beyond the traditional classroom!

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In Person Instruction

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In Person Instruction

Instructors of record requesting exceptional approval for in-person instruction must use the In-Person Instruction Proposal Form. Details, deadlines, and contact information for the proposal process are described in the form's introduction. Other college-specific guidelines should have been distributed to instructors of record via their cognizant chair/director.

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Mapping Remote Courses

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Mapping Remote Courses

Looking for a place to start developing your remote course? Want to decrease the time it takes to build your iLearn or Canvas course site? Mapping your course before you build it, is similar to creating a blueprint before you build your house.

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Policies and Guidance

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Policies and Guidance

Within this section you will find information on managing your online/remote courses. Select the button below to learn more.

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Remote Lab and Performance Arts

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Remote Lab and Performance Arts

Would you like to learn about conducting online labs or do you teach within the performing arts? Within this section you will learn about conducting labs and arts online. Select the button below to learn more.

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Remote Ready Checklist

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Remote Ready Checklist

Are you planning on keeping your course remote or online? Within this section you will find valuable information and resources to help you accomplish this. Select the button below to learn more.

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Summer Instructors

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Summer Instructors

XCITE offers webinars on the Art and Craft of Remote Teaching and is available for consultation to assist with course development. Select the button below to learn more.

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Teaching Checklist

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Teaching Checklist

The XCITE team acknowledges that obstacles can exist when teaching international students remotely. The team also recognizes that there can be many solutions to any challenge. In partnership with campus, XCITE strives to create innovative and impactful teaching and learning solutions that drive academic and inclusive excellence. Select the button below to learn more about teaching international students remotely.

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Assessments

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Assessments

This section provides information about online tests and other assessments. Here you will learn about iLearn exams, enhancing academic integrity, online exams/finals, and remote proctoring.

 
Recent Topics
  • How do I use closed captioning in Yuja?

    Log in to Yuja at ucr.yuja.com and locate your video. Mouse hover over the video and select More. Within the list of menu options select Accessibility. Select either Auto Caption or Human Caption and follow the prompts.

  • Looking to maximize online exam security?

    Discover how to use two layers of security to protect honesty and foster an environment of academic integrity to produce more secure exam outcomes.

    Click here to learn more.

  • Can I use Slack to share videos?

    Yes you can share files through Slack. Please read the documentation here.

  • Where can I find Gradescope?

    You can add Gradescope to both eLearn and iLearn courses.

    eLearn: Go to course Settings/Navigation and enable it from the list of options.

    iLearn: Please review the instructions for enabling Gradescope in iLearn here

  • How do I add a recorded lecture into my course from within YuJa?

    Once your video is added to YuJa, you can choose the "More" option from the video thumbnail menu and select "Links" to grab the link or embed code to provide to students through a course. NOTE: you may want to adjust the link "Security Settings." You can also use the "YuJa Media Chooser" integration to deploy videos to course Pages, Modules, or Content Areas from within a course. See these resources for using the YuJa Media Chooser in eLearn (Canvas) and using the YuJa Media Chooser in iLearn (Blackboard).

  • How do I connect to my Google Drive in Canvas as an Instructor?

    The Google Drive web service allows you to integrate Canvas with your Google Drive account. All users can authorize their Google Drive accounts for access to Google collaborations and assignment uploads. More instructions can be found here

  • How can I filter my view of the eLearn (Canvas) Gradebook by section or make Announcements or Assignments by section?

    You can use the Canvas "Groups" functionality for section designations and then you can filter the Gradebook by "Group:" 
    filter_by_student_group.jpg

    You can also administer Assignments by Group, or make Announcements to specific Groups from within the lecture section of the course.

  • What do I do if students created a recording for a proctoring session but failed to "start an exam"?

    Contact XCITE-help@ucr.edu and someone on the XCITE team will access the students' accounts to relocate the videos to your YuJa

Getting Started

Here are some best practices for moving your content from in-person to online. See our list of strategies and tools for more information and links to resources. Creating an online course provides new avenues and technologies for engaging students beyond the traditional classroom!

Delivering Lectures

You have created the content of your lecture already, so you don't necessarily need to create new media. You can choose to simply post your lecture notes and/or presentation slides. If you like, you can post an audio or video recording of your lecture.

For small classes, you can consider hosting a live class session with your students using Zoom (our video conferencing software). This is not required, but if you would like to interact with your students during the closure, live sessions are an option.

For large classes, live sessions are not recommended. Alternatively, you can use Zoom to record your lecture (either a narrated slide presentation or yourself speaking). It is recommended that you store your recorded lectures in Yuja and link them to your class in the LMS.

All faculty, staff and students have a Basic account by default, and you can sign in to the UCR Zoom site with your regular login information. A free Basic account allows up to 300 participants and video conferences up to forty minutes (and one-on-one meetings with a Basic account do not have a time limit). A Pro account allows video conferences of up to 24 hours with up to 300 participants. You may request a Pro account by using the Information Technology Solutions (ITS) ServiceLink Software Request form.

Posting Required Materials

Good news! You may have already made your course content available on iLearn or eLearn/Canvas. Make sure your iLearn site is clear and organized and the required resources (i.e., PDFs, links to materials, etc.) are accessible.

Keep in mind that many students may only have access to the course site on their phone or tablet, so be sure you are using mobile-friendly formats, PDFs being the most common. Consider saving other files (for example, PowerPoint presentations) to PDF, which are easier to read on phones and tablets and keeps the file size small. See the Accommodations and Accessibility to more information or contact the SDRC at sdrc@ucr.edu.

You can find a comprehensive list of publishers who have increased electronic access during the COVID-19 crisis that UCR faculty and students are eligible for at this library site. More information will be added as it becomes available.

Continuing Labs

Consider aspects of your lab that you could take online. Video demonstrations, simulation, analysis of raw data, other pre- or post-lab work could be done remotely. This is also a good time to start investigating online options like virtual labs, apps, or simulation software. Browse MERLOT Materials for support tools and resources.  Work with your department to propose specific solutions.

Providing Timely Feedback 

For the vast majority of assessments, iLearn tools can be used to assess student learning during a prolonged campus closure. Students can turn in essays, research papers, projects, and video presentations via "Assignments" in iLearn. You can control tests and quizzes by limiting the date/time in which they're available to students. You can place a time limit on the exam, randomize questions, and force completion if students navigate away from iLearn. See our Exams in iLearn guide, or join one of our Live Training sessions.

While remote proctoring is available for cases of high-stakes testing, take some time to reevaluate how you measure student learning. Does it truly align with your course goals? Does it allow students to apply what they've learned in an authentic way? Can you think of a more holistic approach? See the Special Guidance on Remote Proctoring.

Fostering Engagement

Take advantage of the asynchronous tools in iLearn to encourage student interaction with you and with each other. Discussion boards, forums, and social media are good ways to keep the conversation going outside class. Students can collaborate on assignments using Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides. You can also use Zoom for virtual office hours, student discussions, and breakout groups. 

NOTE: All students are encouraged to register their mobile phones on the campus emergency system for campus updates. To register, each student should should visit this service link.
 

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In-Person Instruction

Instructors of record requesting exceptional approval for in-person instruction must use the In-Person Instruction Proposal Form. Details, deadlines, and contact information for the proposal process are described in the form's introduction. Other college-specific guidelines should have been distributed to instructors of record via their cognizant chair/director.

In-Person Instruction Proposal Form

Before submitting the form, instructors of record must develop a plan for in-person instruction that upholds the requirements of the Instructional Continuity Plan, including remote accommodation for students who are unable or unwilling to attend in person. The information below will detail minimum requirements, recommendations, and opportunities for consultation for instructors who are developing remote options.

Developing a Remote Option Plan

Plans for in-person instruction must uphold the requirements of the Instructional Continuity Plan, including remote accommodation for students who are unable or unwilling to attend in person. Please read through the materials below to learn more about minimum requirements, recommendations, remote options, and consultation.

Minimum Requirements
  •  Safety Policies: Your syllabus should clearly outline the policies for mask-wearing, the sanitizing of spaces/materials, and distancing during class. There should be clear instructions for a staggered entry/dismissal to maintain distance. Make sure to include the policies and requirements for the online students as well (e.g. webcams, software, exam proctoring instructions, etc.
  • Backup Plan: Develop a backup plan in case you are unable to keep teaching. If you test positive for the virus, is there someone able and willing to step in? If you have potentially exposed your students, there needs to be a plan in place for those in-person students who now must transition to online. 
Remote Accommodation Options

The following remote accommodation options and strategies are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Whatever strategy (or combination of strategies) you choose, be aware of the workload involved in developing a course wherein in-person and online students receive a quality course with a prepared instructor. 

Consultation

If you would like talk further about your options, you can meet with a member of the XCITE team. We are here to help you plan your course, whether in-person, remote, or something in between.

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Mapping Remote Courses

Starting With Learning Outcomes

Looking for a place to start developing your remote course? Want to decrease the time it takes to build your iLearn or Canvas course site? Mapping your course before you build it, is similar to creating a blueprint before you build your house. The top three XCITE recommendations when designing your remote course are:

  1. Start Small. Start by redesigning an activity or a week. Don’t think if it as a full course yet.
  2. Chunk Your Content. Make your online lectures no longer than 10 – 15 minutes. Divide them into specific topics.
  3. Have a Plan and be Consistent. Map your remote course to speed up the course development process, be consistent in your design, and provide thoughtful activities to promote deeper understanding of important ideas.

Start mapping your remote course by creating five columns and ten rows in a Word document. Name the columns from left to right as Week, Learning Outcomes, Assessments, Activities, Technology.  Identify which week in your course will have the most interaction. Starting with your most active week will give you a good idea of what tools are available to support your vision and how much time it will take you to complete your course design. For example:

Course Name:
Introduction to Beer and the Science of Brewing
Learning Outcomes Assessments Activities Technology
Week 1        

Week 2:

The Soul of Beer

 

Identify the properties of barley that facilitate good malt.

 

Classify types of malts and when to use them.

 

Explain the nature of the malting process.

 

Articulate the reason for the stage of the malting process.

Lecture embedded quiz questions

 

Unit quiz

 

In-class polling

Read: 

  • Text Book: p. 103 - 120
  • Malting article

 

Watch Video Lectures:

  • Lecture 1: Barley the Properties that Facilitate Good Malt
  • Lecture 2: The Malting Process
  • Lecture 3: Types of Malt

 

Activities (Do):

  • Barley identification activity 
  • Malting Process activity
  • Deconstruct a Beer activity

Canvas (LMS) — content delivery, unit quiz, and communication

 

Articulate Storyline — Interactive online activities (Barely/Malting) & office hours

 

YUJA — lecture recordings, video transcriptions, video embedded quiz questions, media storage

 

Google Docs (Deconstruct a Beer)

 

Poll Everywhere

Work from left to right, starting with the end in mind. When writing your learning outcomes use measurable active verbs. Next, identify what types of assessments you will use to measure if students have reached the learning outcomes. Identify the types of activities you will offer students to help students be successful on the assessments and reach the learning outcomes. Finally, identify the technology needed to build and distribute the content. Please consider adding learning outcomes to your syllabus to help your students prepare for success in your course. If you would like to discuss the first draft of your mapped activity or week, reach out to an XCITE consultant at xcite-help@ucr.edu.

Download the Flyer 

 

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Policies & Guidance

Within this section you will find information on managing your online/remote courses.

  • IP Guidance
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    Ownership of Course Materials (including, but not limited to, lectures, lecture notes and materials, syllabi, study guides, and web-ready content):

    Unless faculty members have used exceptional University resources to create course materials, they own the copyrights in the course materials they create. The current transition to remote teaching does NOT constitute a use of exceptional resources. This means that only the faculty member and anyone to whom the faculty member has granted permission may reproduce, distribute or display (including digitally posting or uploading) course materials.

    SEE THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA’S 2003 POLICY ON OWNERSHIP OF COURSE MATERIALS

     

    Recordings of Course Presentations (including notes and audio/video recordings):

    No entity or individual may give, sell or otherwise distribute recordings of course presentations, except for Disability Services Center, who may grant the accommodation of providing course recordings to students with a disability.

    SEE THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA’S 2005 POLICY ON THE USE OF RECORDINGS OF COURSE PRESENTATIONS

    • Steps You Can Take to Protect Your Course Materials:

      1.    Post your materials only on a platform that is password-protected and only accessible to registered and enrolled students.

      2.    Advise students that your course materials and your course presentations are protected and that students may not share them except as provided by U.S. copyright law and University policy. You should consider sharing this information with students in your first class meeting, on your course website, and on your syllabus.  You might use the following language:

      “My lectures and course materials, including PowerPoint presentations, tests, outlines, and similar materials, are protected by U.S. copyright law and by University policy. I am the exclusive owner of the copyright in those materials that I create. You may take notes and make copies of non-audio course materials for your own use. You may also share those materials with other students who are registered and enrolled in this course.

      You may not reproduce, distribute or display (digitally post/upload) lecture notes or recordings or course materials in any other way—whether or not a fee is charged—without my express written consent. You also may not allow others to do so. See UCOP Copyright -- Use of recordings of course presentations

      If you do so, you may be subject to student conduct proceedings under the Code of Student Conduct, Section 102.23.

      Similarly, you own the copyright in your original papers and exam essays. If I am interested in posting your answers or papers on the course web site, I will ask for your written permission.”

      3.    Include a notice on every page of your course materials (in a header or footer) that they are protected by copyright: “© Faculty Name 2020”

      If you also include your UCR email address, people who want to ask your permission to use your materials will be able to contact you easily.

      4.    If you are concerned about students posting materials to CourseHero, know that CourseHero has advised UC counsel that its filtering tool will, in nearly all instances, prevent the upload of materials that include this sentence in a header or footer: “This content is protected and may not be shared, uploaded or distributed.”

      5.    If you find that your material has been uploaded to CourseHero, police your copyrights by sending a DMC takedown notice using the CourseHero takedown portal at: https://www.coursehero.com/copyright-infringement/.

      This usually takes about five minutes, and once a valid takedown notice is submitted (which is why you should use the portal), CourseHero has a duty to act “expeditiously”—usually 2-3 days.

    • Accessibility Tips and Resources for Online Instruction

      UCR-Recommended Platforms

      As the University moves toward remote learning for Spring Quarter, we are aware that there are a number of tools and companies offering assistance.  Not all of these platforms have been vetted to ensure they meet the needs and standards of the University. Unapproved platforms present concerns with respect to privacy, accessibility compliance and the welfare of our students and to the University as a legal and policy matter, among other concerns.

      Please use only UCR-recommended platforms for administering online exams and delivering remote instruction. These recommended platforms may impose some constraints on instructors but using them provides appropriate accessibility, privacy and security for our students. Use of iLearn (Blackboard) is strongly encouraged and will satisfy most instructors’ needs. Use of YouTube is discouraged. Faculty who already utilize YouTube should contact XCITE for further instructions on how to make Youtube ADA compliant. Other UCR-recommended platforms and best practices can be found on the Teaching @ UCR website.

      Consider contacting Exploration Center for Innovative Teaching and Engagement (XCITE) or the Student Disability Resource Center (SDRC) to ask about the platforms you are using and their accessibility.

       

    • FERPA and Data Security

      To ensure adherence to federal and state privacy laws, it is imperative that all work with student data continues to be performed using UCR-recommended platforms and tools, even while using personal computer devices to connect to UCR servers and services. Additionally, any email communication with students or about students must be done using UCR email.

      To view information about copyrights and teaching, visit the UCR Library page on Copyright & Teaching.

       

      SDRC Approved Disability Accommodations

      Students with disabilities who participate in your alternate instruction may need additional accommodations for participation.  If you are unsure as to how to provide accommodations for a student, please feel free to reach out to the SDRC.

      Faculty will get notification via email if there are letters of accommodation in the R’Ability portal. The faculty member may access the R’Ability portal at any time to see students with SDRC-approved accommodations in their course, including descriptions of accommodations. If a student is approved by SDRC for exam accommodations, faculty will receive additional notice prior to an exam if the student wishes to use their accommodations on their exam. For more information about the accommodations process, please see the Faculty and Staff Resources page on the SDRC website.

      All online content must be accessible to students in your course when posted. SDRC will continue to partner with XCITE and instructors to ensure students’ disability accommodations are provided.

      If you have questions about the provision of accommodations as we move forward in these settings, please contact SDRC.

      •    SDRC Testing Center, sdrc-exams@ucr.edu, 951-827-3028

      •    SDRC Assistive Tech/Alt Media, sdrc-at@ucr.edu, 951-827-5381

      •    SDRC Main Desk, sdrc@ucr.edu, 951-827-3861

       

    • Exam Guides

      •  iLearn

    • General Information

      •  Best practices for moving your content online in case of campus closures or emergencies

      •  3 Low-Tech Ways to Approach Emergency Remote Teaching

       

      The following tips for increasing accessibility in online courses were adapted from Explore Access.

    • Consider including an Accessibility Statement on your Syllabi

      Students with Disabilities: UC Riverside is committed to providing equal access to learning opportunities to students with documented disabilities. To ensure access to this course, and your program, please contact the Student Disability Resource Center (SDRC) to engage in a confidential conversation about the process for requesting accommodations in a course or classroom. More information can be found on sdrc.ucr.edu. If you are a student registered with the SDRC, please ensure you request your quarterly accommodations through rability.ucr.edu.

      Or use this syllabus template that includes an accessibility statement as well as links to other institutional resources and policies (e.g., academic integrity, Title IX, ITS, academic support services, copyright statement, etc.)

    • Sharing Accessible Documents-MS Word

      If you are sharing information in a document, consider utilizing a Word document as the format. This allows students who may be using assistive technology to access text-to-speech and/or enlarged text in a way that does not disrupt the flow of the document.

      •    Use headings to structure the document.

      •    Add alternative text to images.

      •    Create links by using meaningful text descriptions.

      •    Avoid the use of SmartArt.

      •    Avoid adding text boxes.

      •    Avoid putting important information in headers or footers.

    • Sharing Accessible Documents-PDFs

      If you are providing a document in PDF format for students to access, the PDF must be a text based/searchable PDF.

      Here are a few tips to get you started:

      •    Start with an accessible source document. By following the previous suggestions for creating an accessible MS Word document, you are on your way to creating an accessible PDF.

      •    Save the MS Word document to PDF by choosing, Save as PDF rather than printing to PDF.

      •    Simple documents should convert pretty well from MS Word to PDF. More complex documents may need to be checked for accessibility and even remediated for accessibility.

      •    If you have a Professional version of Adobe Acrobat, you can run an accessibility check.

      •    You may also want to check with XCITE/SDRC for assistance in making your PDF documents accessible

      If you are using PDFs that were created by someone else, check to make sure they are accessible.

      •    Can you highlight the text on the page? If not, it may be an image of the text instead of real text.

      •    Older PDFs created by scanning an article are often purely an image.

      •    Work with someone in XCITE/SDRC to determine the best approach to making these documents accessible.

    • Sharing Accessible Slide Presentations

      When you use MS PowerPoint to teach online you may be using it in a variety of ways.

      •    Upload it so that students can download it to view on their own computer.

      •    Load it into the LMS so that students view it as a slide presentation there.

      •    Show it during a live video conferencing session.

      No matter the end product, there are several things that need to be considered as you create the presentation.

      •    Choose a design template that offers good contrast.

      •    Avoid starting with a blank slide and adding text boxes.

      •    Instead, choose the layout that fits your slide design.

      •    Avoid the “Design ideas” presented by PowerPoint. Some are accessible but many are not.

      •    Look at the “outline view” of the slide to see if the text on your slide is visible there.

      •    Describe images, charts and graphs with alternative text.

      •    Use sans serif fonts and make sure your text is 24-point or larger for online classes and 28-point or larger for face-to-face classes.

      •    Create an accessible PDF version of the PowerPoint for students to download. This version will be more accessible to screen reader users.

    • Video Accessibility

      Video content can be much more engaging than more static content, adding great benefit to an online course. At the same time, if access is not considered, video content can present barriers for many students. So, what needs to be considered to make sure video content is accessible?

      •    For videos embedded in a course, the video player needs to be accessible by keyboard and the controls need to be labeled properly so that a screen reader user can access all the video controls.

      •    The video will need to be captioned.

      •    The visual content will need to be described.

      •    A transcript will need to be created that includes the captions and the descriptions of the visual content.

    • Editing and Captioning Videos

      When choosing a video that has been created by someone else, make sure it is captioned. Automatic captions do not provide equal access.

      If you are uploading a video to a platform, such as YouTube, which provides for automatic captioning, you will need to go back and edit the captions to meet accessibility standards.

      To edit captions on YouTube:

      1.    Upload your video file to your YouTube channel. YouTube will automatically generate captions.

      2.    Go to your Video Manager.

      3.    Next to the video you want to edit captions for, click the drop-down next to "Edit" -> Subtitles/CC.

      4.    Click the caption track you want to edit.

      5.    Click Edit above the video.

      6.    Click Publish edits

      Alternatively, you can create your own captions using a free online tool like amara.org. You can save your SRT captioning file and upload it onto your video. Here are the directions on how to import captions directly to YouTube: 1.    Go to your Video Manager.

      2.    Next to the video you want to edit captions for, click the drop-down next to "Edit" -> Subtitles/CC.

      3.    Select “Add a new track.”

      4.    Upload your SRT file and identify the language. Your captions should appear on the video momentarily.

    • Audio Description

      Audio description refers to providing information about the visual aspects of a video to someone who is blind or who has low vision. Audio description can be provided as part of the general narration or can be added after the fact. If the video is simply a recording of you providing a lecture, then there would be little need for audio description. If you are also showing slides, you'll want to describe what is in the slides. The following will help you consider what aspects of a video need additional audio description.

      •    Are there sections of the video that provide content in text only (i.e. credits, section titles, statistics, etc.)?

      •    Are the names and/or titles of speakers listed under the speaker?

      •    Are there presentation slides that are being shared that are not spoken by the narrator?

      •    Are there other visuals that add to the content of the video?

      •    Is something being demonstrated in the video?

    • Providing a Transcript

      Once you have your transcript for the captions and the audio descriptions, you can combine the two to create a document that will make your video accessible to students who are DeafBlind. Simply create an accessible MS Word document with this content and provide a link to it below the video.

      Podcasts

      As with other multi-media solutions, if you have audio only content you’re also required to supply an accurate text-based transcript.

    • Guidelines for Specific Content

      Slide Images

      You can post your own content online, but images from other sources should not be posted in publicly available locations. Please be sure to post recorded classes in approved locations.

    • In-Lecture Use of Audio or Video

      Playing audio or video off of physical media during an in-person class session is most likely protected under a provision of copyright law often referred to as the "face-to-face teaching classroom use” exemption. However, that exemption doesn't cover playing the same media online. If you can limit audio and video use for your course to relatively brief clips, you may be able to justify those in lecture recordings or live-casts as fair use. For media use longer than brief clips, you may need to have students independently access the content outside of your lecture videos. Some further options are outlined below.

    • Video & Audio

      •    The Library course reserves film streaming program will remain operational and accessible during Spring 2020.  However we may not be able to process some of the new titles requested, due to the closure.

      •    For Library licensed video and audio collections, click on Library databases and use the audio and video filters on the left. Remember to log into the campus VPN before accessing Library content from off campus. The two most commonly used film resources are AVON and Kanopy.

      •    Wherever possible, streaming media sources should be used. For more information on Fair Use and copyright during the COVID-19 closure, see the Public Statement of Library Copyright Specialists: Fair Use & Emergency Remote Teaching & Research.

      •    If you need help finding a title or would like to request the Library purchase new video or audio materials to support remote instruction, submit your request via the Suggest a Purchase form.

    • ebooks

      •    See ebooks at UCR for information about collections available for you.

      •    Some ebook collections, like JSTOR, can be used in classes immediately via the campus VPN.

      •    Some ebook platforms (such as Ebook Central and EBSCOhost) limit access to a small number of users at a time or cut off access after a certain number of uses. If you plan on using an ebook (other than one from JSTOR) as a required reading, let the Library know by emailing one of the Collection Strategists and they will confirm if a multi-user license can be obtained and, if one cannot, will work with you to identify an alternate resource.

      •    If you need an ebook that the Library does not already have in its collection, submit your request via the Suggest a Purchase form.

    • Course Reserves

      •    Course Reserve services will remain operational during Spring 2020.  However, physical material placed on course reserve will be inaccessible to students during the campus closure.  As an alternative, we are working to obtain electronic access to requested material when available.  We consider Fair Use Guidelines when reviewing requests.

      •    The Collection Strategists are available to assist in identifying alternate solutions for material not available electronically. Please contact Course Reserves Coordinator, Joanne Austin if you have further questions.

      •    Posting resources on iLearn that you have obtained yourself should follow the same practice that you use for in-person courses (see the Fair Use section of the Public Statement of Library Copyright Specialists). For more information on this topic, please see UC’s systemwide “Copyright and Fair Use” policy.

      We hope this guidance is helpful. Thank you again for working to provide remote forms of instruction so that our students can continue their studies without interruption in Spring Quarter.

      Some of this content is adapted from “Rapidly shifting your course from in-person to online” by Nancy Sims @CopyrightLibn, University of Minnesota Libraries, and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License. Thanks to our colleagues at other UC campuses for providing earlier versions of this guidance.

    • ZOOM to Yuja Instructions

      Button with the following link: https://keepteaching.ucr.edu/sites/g/files/rcwecm4316/files/2021-02/Zoom_to_Yuja_2021_Instructions_v4.pdf

      Remote Teaching/Policies and Guidance/Protecting Privacy and Student Data

      Guidance on Protecting Privacy and Data During Remote Teaching Using Zoom while COVID-19 Modifications are in Effect

      A.    Purpose and Principles

      Zoom is the primary recommended software tool for remote live and recorded academic sessions and meetings at UC Riverside. Zoom, when used in conjunction with iLearn, addresses privacy, security, and accessibility for people with disabilities. This document provides basic guidance on how to protect privacy and data while addressing accessibility using Zoom and iLearn during remote working and teaching.  Click on the hyperlinks throughout this document for quick access to important use instructions.

      For more information and tools for remote teaching, please see UCR's Teaching @ UCR website.

      UC Riverside protects the privacy of faculty, students and staff while working or participating in educational programs. Use of remote delivery software and technologies heightens the criticality of privacy and the need to use the least invasive means of engaging in these alternative methods of conducting our activities. Existing law and policy that address privacy remain in effect.

       

      All faculty, staff and students must follow these principles:

      1.    Video or audio recording of a lecture is permitted but only with advance notice and opportunity to opt out of video/audio participation. This requires that you download and install the native Zoom app for your computer.

      •    Where recording is permitted, it is permitted only by the host (typically instructor or meeting chair). Students and/or meeting participants and any student-hosted meetings are prohibited from recording of any kind. Accommodations for students with special needs will occur through the instructor's recording.

      2.    Video or audio recording (including taping, recording, photographing, screen capture and other methods of capture) for purposes other than instruction is prohibited absent a strong rationale and only if the host provides advance notice and opportunity to opt out of video/audio participation.

      3.    During video conferencing, there is a chat function that permits participants to ask questions and engage in dialogue with the class or meeting proceeding. Recording, including photographing, screen capture, or other copying methods, of chat exchanges is prohibited, except by the instructor or meeting chair when advance notice is provided.

      4.    Online advising can occur via chat, audio, or video conferencing using Zoom or other approved software tools, or by phone. Sessions should not be recorded; rather, the advisor should log notes in the customary fashion.

       

      B.    Tips for Privacy Protections for Synchronistic Videoconferencing

      1.    Participants can use Zoom’s virtual background feature, when available, if they do not want to have their surroundings visible.

      •    To use a Virtual Background click the up arrow by the Zoom video icon and click on Choose Virtual Background.

      •    Select only appropriate virtual backgrounds.

      •    Be mindful of others in your remote location who may not wish to be visible or recorded in the background.

      •     Ensure sensitive conversations cannot be overheard or work observed by unauthorized persons in the alternate work location.

      2.    Consider whether only the host needs to be visible in order to minimize bandwidth usage, and instruct participants not to enable their video if not needed.  A single video stream can ease Internet bandwidth for all participants. If video of all participants is preferred, all participants should conduct themselves in the same manner as they would in an in-person setting.

      •    Participants should be properly attired, should not gesture inappropriately, should not move from room to room, use the restroom, or engage in other distracting activities while still engaged in the video session.

      3.    Set screen sharing to host only. Under Settings, stop others from sharing in the meeting.

      •    Before screen sharing, close all applications, emails and documents that you will not use in that session. The host can also allow screen sharing by participants, options are available by clicking on the up arrow by the Share Screen icon. If the host determines that screen sharing by participants is needed, the host should remind participants not to share other sensitive information during the meeting inadvertently.

      4.    Protect your classes and meetings delivered remotely from having unauthorized individuals join. (“Zoom bombing” is the practice of uninvited individuals entering a video call).

      •    Videoconferencing hosts should monitor participants on teleconference calls to reduce the chance of unauthorized persons on the calls.

      •    Use a unique meeting ID for each meeting or require authentication and a passcode for participants (Settings → Profile → Personal Meeting ID; Meetings → Authenticate, Password).

      •    Limit reuse of access codes: if you’ve used the same code for many meetings, others will have access to your meetings using that same passcode.

      •    Mute all: as the host, you can mute all in the Participant window. You can also stop participants from unmuting themselves, and instead ask them to use chat for questions.

      •    Remove: from that Participants window, you can mouse over a participant’s name, and several options will appear, including Remove. Your UCR Zoom settings are by default set to bar removed participants from returning.

      •    Lock Meeting: this will stop all new participants from joining a meeting (NOTE: if you lock a meeting, your actual students will not be able to join late or rejoin if they lose their connection).

      For further security features and options for Zoom see the Zoom Security page on Teaching @ UCR as well as Zoom's recommendations for securing your virtual classroom.

       

      C.    When Audio or Video Recording is Necessary for Videoconferencing-based Courses and Meetings

      1.    Give notice before recording begins and preferably with the meeting invitation, in the syllabus or other scheduling tool. Approved notification language, which provides options for opting out of being recorded:

      •    This [class/meeting] is being conducted over Zoom.  As the host, I will be recording this session.  The recording feature for others is disabled so that no one else will be able to record this session through Zoom. No recording by other means is permitted.

      •    This session will be posted at the iLearn class website unless otherwise notified.  If you have privacy concerns and do not wish to appear in the recording, do not turn on your video. If you also prefer to use a pseudonym instead of your name, please let me know what name you will be using so that I know who you are during the session.  If you would like to ask a question, you may do so privately through the Zoom chat by addressing your chat question to me only (and not to “everyone”), or you may contact me by another private method.  If you have questions or concerns about this, please contact me.

      •    Pursuant to the terms of the agreement between the vendor and UCR, the data is used solely for this purpose and the vendor is prohibited from redisclosing this information. UCR also does not use the data for any other purpose.  Recordings will be deleted when no longer necessary. However, the recording may become part of an administrative disciplinary record if misconduct occurs during a videoconference.

      2.    Zoom will automatically inform all participants that the session is being recorded. Be aware not all participants may be running the latest version of Zoom that implements this feature.

      3.    Recordings should be retained no longer than necessary and should only be retained on approved University devices, platforms or networks.

      4.    Make clear on any class website that all recording is prohibited other than by the instructor.

       

      D.    Disability Accommodations

      Visit the Teaching @ UCR page for Disability Resource Tips for Online Instruction

       

      E.    Online Exams and Proctoring

      Requiring students to turn on their camera to be watched or recorded at home during an exam poses significant privacy concerns and should not be undertaken lightly. Instructors are encouraged to consider other options that will uphold integrity and good assessment design.

      During classes, students should be encouraged to use the virtual background feature of Zoom if they do not want their surroundings to be visible. However, the point of proctoring is to be able to assure that students are completing their exams independently and without assistance, so students are encouraged to take their exam in a room that has no one else present.

      Several proctoring services use machine learning, AI, eye-tracking, key-logging, and other technologies to detect potential cheating. If instructors are using one of these services during the COVID-19 measures, they must provide explicit notice to the students before the exam including that if cheating is suspected, the recording may become part of the student’s administrative disciplinary record. Instructors are encouraged to consider other options that are privacy-protective and still preserve academic integrity, where possible.

       

      F.    Online Advising

      Online advising can occur via chat, audio, or video conferencing but should be done using Zoom or other service approved by the campus, or by phone. Sessions should not be recorded; rather, the advisor should log notes in the customary fashion. The advisor should always be logged in on campus or through a VPN when advising.

      Follow the guidance in Section B, above.

      G.    Privacy Data

      Protections with Zoom Zoom’s Privacy Policy and their Privacy Shield certification reflect that Zoom does not access data files not specifically authorized by the user (e.g. if you give Zoom access to your calendar then it will be able to read your calendar events only). Zoom does collect user data and utilizes cookies to store information on preferences. In the event you record a Zoom session, a file folder is created so that the recording can be saved and made available for class use. As a user of Zoom, if you give Zoom access to any files or programs you need to manage cookies through your browser settings in the way you do with other applications. Remember that UCR policy and UC Security Standards do apply to any computer you use for your Zoom session. The relevant policies and standards are listed below.

      •    Electronic Communications Policy (Campus Policy 400-31)

      •    Electronic Information Security Policy (Campus Policy 400-32)

      •    Computer Systems Access, Use, and Security (Campus Policy 400-35)

      •    Notification of Security Breaches Involving Personal Information (Campus Policy 400-60)

      •    UCOP Minimum Security Standard

    • ourse Reserves

      UCR Bookstore

      While regular bookstore services are closed from March 16 to until (at least) April 30,  online order will be available .  For general questions, please call x24213 or 24456 or email sm8106@bncollege.com.

      UCR Library Course Reserves

      The UCR Library is working hard to ensure as much access to course materials as possible for our students during the spring quarter. If you have already submitted a course reserve request for your textbook, we are looking into electronic access options for those titles, as well as alternative options that are available electronically. You can still submit a request for course reserves. If you would like to discuss alternative options for your course materials, please contact the collection strategist in your field.

      We are currently working on a variety of options for streaming video. Please submit your request to the course reserves page and we will be in touch about options.

    • Loan 2 Learn

      Students now have access to a loaner device program called Loan2Learn (L2L). UC Riverside has launched the L2L Program for students in need of off-campus access to a learning device. Any student who does not have off-campus access to a device that supports remote teaching and learning—such as a laptop, desktop, or tablet—is asked to apply to the L2L Program.

      Have students take the following survey. If you have a student that might qualify, have them apply here.


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Remote Lab & Performance Arts

How to Conduct Lab and Fine Arts/Performance Remotely

As you plan to move your instruction online, remember to start by connecting with your department. Because of the uniqueness of each discipline, departments and colleges will be the best place to start. Similarly, check in with your colleagues at other institutions and share ideas, tips, and tools. While your course will certainly look much different, it can still provide a valuable experience for students.

UCR XCITE-led Trainings

The XCITE team is providing instructors and TAs with Zoom and iLearn training to assist in delivering labs/arts online (see the webinar schedule and recordings). XCITE is also available for one-on-one consultations to brainstorm solutions and provide training (email us at XCITE@ucr.edu or submit a support request.

Options include:

•    Record a lab demonstration by faculty/TAs

•    Simulate/demonstrate the data-gathering experience

•    Analyze data from previous labs in previous quarters/build repositories of data from past iterations of course, or use data from literature

•    Contact your textbook vendors to see if they provide virtual labs for your course and post in iLearn

•    Students can use cameras/phones to document activities or performances and share in iLearn

 

JoVE

The Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE), is a video platform featuring videos that teach fundamental concepts and techniques for the lab. Via JoVE, researchers and students can view the intricate details of cutting-edge experiments rather than read them in text articles. The UCR Library has the full JoVE collection available.

Henry Stewart Talks: Biomedical & Life Sciences Collection

HSTalks provides animated lectures, seminar-style talks, and case studies. Editors and lecturers are leading world experts and practitioners, including Nobel Laureates, drawn from academia research institutes, commerce, industry, the professions and government.

For more tools and information, see:

Virtual Labs

•    ChemCollective (Collection of both simulations and virtual labs for chemistry)

•    MERLOT (Science apps)

•    PhET (interactive simulations)

•    LabXchange (molecular biology labs)

•    Labster (simulaitons)

•    Physics Simulations (free collection of physics simulations)

•    Froguts Frog Dissection App (3D virtual lab for phones and tablets)

•    Food Science Experiments (Resources from Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences)

•    Geosciences resource spreadsheet (community collection)

•    Ecology and environmental sciences resource spreadsheet (community collection)

•    General Resources for Digital Science and Labs (from Tiny Earth, a network of instructors and students focused on student sourcing antibiotic discovery from soil)

Museum Collections

•    Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

•    Harvard Digital Collections

Other Considerations

•    Be clear in your instructions and expectations. Students are going to need more detailed instructions and clear expectations for assignments. Keep in mind that students may require more flexibility and understanding during this time.

•    Access to software. Identify which software your students might need, and what they have access to.

•    Ask students for feedback along the way. Check in with students to find out how these new activities and methods are working for them.

•    Hold live sessions in Zoom. You can record lectures as well as hold live sessions (or have TAs hold sections) via Zoom.

Thanks to Indiana University, Middlebury, Harvard University, and Princeton University for help in creating this post.


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Remote Ready Checklist

Please use this prioritized checklist to assure your course is remote-ready for your students. Additional resources on each topic are available here on Teaching @ UCR (and we are adding resources daily). Email the XCITE team at xcite@ucr.edu with questions or support requests.

Download a printable version of the checklist here.

Planning Stage: Reworking your course

•    Reassess your course goals: Have clear and realistic course goals for your students. What do you want to them to leave your course knowing? How can you help them get there with the time, tools, and online space you currently have?

PROTIP: Keep it simple as you go remote for fall quarter. Try using the Rule of 2’s (developed by Plymouth State University's Open CoLab) to focus on what is most important and workable for you.

•    Develop remote alternatives: What are the essential course materials, activities, and assignments for the quarter? What will those look like in a remote-teaching situation? This website is dedicated to helping you do this. Check out the quick guides, training videos, webinars, faculty posts, and more.

Syllabus/Course Information (use syllabus template for quick-fix)

•    Include key information: use this syllabus template to make sure you've included all required components. It is important to be even clear thorough in your policies and assignment expectations than you would in a live class. If you don't use the template, include all the components listed below.

Contact information (include Zoom link, if applicable); learning information: course goals, required materials, course components (e.g. assignments, discussions), course schedule, tech requirements. Clearly state course policies; late/make-up work, availability & communication preferences, etiquette/participation expectations, how you would like students to share accommodation information confidentially.  Include links to institutional resources and policies (academic integrity, Title IX, ITS, accessibility, copyright, grade appeal, academic support services, etc).

•    Course navigation is consistent: Use consistent organization and weekly rhythm so students know what to expect (for example, each week students watch a lecture, read required materials, participate in the discussion board by Wednesday, and complete a response paper by Sunday at 11:59pm).

PROTIP: Consider making all work due on the same day and time for the rest of the quarter. When you create Assignments in iLearn, use a consistent time (like Sunday night at 11:59 pm) for all weekly assignments/discussion posts to be due. Students who now have extra care/work responsibilities and different environments than they expected may need the weekend to get everything done.

•    Review with students how to use iLearn communication, assignment submissions, assignment feedback, checking grades, etc. You can post a link to this Quick Guide in your syllabus or welcome letter.

 

Building Course Content

•    Post example/sample assignment, rubrics, and/or make your expectations clear. Your assignment or activity instructions and expectations will need to be especially clear in a remote learning situation. Provide detailed guidance.

•    Check that all links, files, and videos are active and working.

PROTIP: Focus on getting any necessary materials available to your students via iLearn. Instead of trying to recreate your in-person classroom with lecture videos/hosted Zoom sessions, think about the Internet as your classroom. Where can you send students for great information? Students can explore and share what they learned. Remember, like you, your students are also worried and have plenty to focus on right now!

•    Provide an opportunity for course feedback: check in with your students (perhaps after the first three/four weeks) formally (anonymous survey) and/or informally to see how the course is going and if any changes/revisions are necessary.

•    Create spaces for student-to-student interaction (e.g., discussions, collaborative assignments), student-to-teacher interactions (e.g., assignment feedback, virtual office hours), and student-content interaction (e.g. assignments, discussions).

PROTIP: A weekly discussion board is an easy, low-tech way to provide a space for all three of these interactions. Consider requiring students to post about your course material (perhaps citing/quoting two references from the required text they found most interesting) and requiring them to respond to two other classmates' posts. This will get an actual conversation going, all focused around your required material. You (or TA) can hop in as needed to contribute and offer feedback.

 

Beginning the course

•    Send a Welcome Letter in iLearn Announcements (or even post a short Welcome video) that welcomes students, introduces yourself, directs them to your syllabus, and tells explains exactly what they should do in that first week.

•    Set up an Introductions Discussion Board in iLearn so students can introduce themselves at the beginning of the course, and you can get a sense of who your students are and what their current situation looks like.

PROTIP: Set up a FAQ discussion board where students can post questions about the course.

 

Managing the Course

•    Communicate regularly (even more than you would in a live class). Use iLearn to communicate with your students. You can use other tools like Zoom and recorded video if you are comfortable, but you can always stick to iLearn if you are not. The key is to CONNECT regularly. Prioritize simple solutions.

PROTIP: Send an announcement every Monday to outlining the week. Try to send an announcement when a current even pops up that is relevant to your content.

•    Offer students specific, meaningful, and prompt feedback: Your assignments and discussions are spaces where students are practicing with the concepts you've presented. Assessment feedback can be a space where you personally connect with them.

•    Remain flexible: Your students, though they are now accessible only online, are still human. The best thing you can do is model flexibility, understanding, and adaptability. Provide a path for all students to achieve the course learning outcomes this quarter, no matter their situation.

 

Accessibility

•    Accommodation statement: This should be in your syllabus or easily located (note: it's already included in the syllabus template).

•    Include closed-captioning: Audio/Video resources should (ideally) have closed-captions. You can easily do this in YuJa.

•    Check Contrast: On the materials you produce (e.g., slide presentations), use sufficient contrast between text and background makes information easy to read. Use this PowerPoint template to avoid issues. You can also use a web checker for this.

•    Images: accompanied by text descriptions (Alt text) or captions for more complex descriptions.

PROTIP: Reach out to the SDRC for more information and guidance on accommodations and accessibility.

 

Teaching Checklist for Teaching International Students Remotely

Download the Checklist 

The XCITE team acknowledges that obstacles can exist when teaching international students remotely. The team also recognizes that there can be many solutions to any challenges. In partnership with campus, XCITE strives to create innovative and impactful teaching and learning solutions that drive academic and inclusive excellence. Please consider the following challenges and solutions for supporting the success of UCR international students.

 

  • If you have not done so already, create a space in iLearn ("assignment" or separate "Content Area") for students to submit their final paper. Make sure to notify students of any formatting requirements or other instructions.

    To create an assignment in iLearn,

    1. Click "Assignment" from the right vertical menu.
    2. Click "Assessment" and then choose "Assignment" from the dropdown menu.
    3. In this "Create Assignment" page, you will title the assignment, provide instructions, attach any necessary documents, chose a due date, and designate the point value.
    4. Click the "Submit" button in the bottom right corner.
    5. To edit the assignment, click the arrow to the right of the assignment title.
  • You can have students submit a presentation, performance, or demonstration online. Students can submit a variety of digital files in iLearn for you to view their slide presentations and photos. Students can also create a video recording of a presentation or performance, upload to YouTube (public or private), and submit the link in iLearn.

    NOTE: If you want all of your students to view the presentations of their peers, make sure you create a discussion board (in addition to the "assignment" where you will provide feedback/grades) and have students post their files or video links there. Other students will then be able to access the presentation and provide feedback.

    To create an assignment in iLearn:
    1. Click "Assignment" from the right vertical menu.
    2. Click "Assessment" and then choose "Assignment" from the dropdown menu.
    3. In this "Create Assignment" page, you will title the assignment, provide instructions, attach any necessary documents, chose a due date, and designate the point value.
    4. Click the "Submit" button in the bottom right corner.
    5. To edit the assignment, click the arrow to the right of the assignment title.
    Instructions for students on submitting a video recording to iLearn:
    1. Use a camera (a smart phone camera will work), webcam, or screen capture to film your presentation, performance, or project.
    2. Go to YouTube (or another video sharing site we can all access) and sign in with your UCR email.
    3. Click the video camera icon on the top right corner and choose "Upload Video" from the dropdown.
    4. Choose the file you want to upload to YouTube and follow the instructions.
    5. Once your video is posted, turn in the link to the assignment and (possibly) discussion board.
    Instructions for students on recording a narrated slide presentation:
    1. Step-by-step text instructions to record narrated PowerPoint presentations
    2. Video instructions on narrated slide presentations (you can share the link with your students: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdeRJpIxCF0

     

  • You can have students submit a project online. Students can submit a variety of digital files in iLearn for you to view their slide presentations and photos. Students can also create a video recording displaying their project, upload to YouTube (public or private), and submit the link in iLearn.

    NOTE: If you want all of your students to view the projects of their peers, make sure you create a discussion board (in addition to the "assignment" where you will provide feedback/grades) and have students post their files or video links there. Other students will then be able to access the presentation and provide feedback.

    To create an assignment in iLearn:
    1. Click "Assignment" from the right vertical menu.
    2. Click "Assessment" and then choose "Assignment" from the dropdown menu.
    3. In this "Create Assignment" page, you will title the assignment, provide instructions, attach any necessary documents, chose a due date, and designate the point value.
    4. Click the "Submit" button in the bottom right corner.
    5. To edit the assignment, click the arrow to the right of the assignment title.
    Instructions for students on submitting a video recording to iLearn:
    1. Use a camera (a smart phone camera will work), webcam, or screen capture to film your presentation, performance, or project.
    2. Go to YouTube (or another video sharing site we can all access) and sign in with your UCR email.
    3. Click the video camera icon on the top right corner and choose "Upload Video" from the dropdown menu.
    4. Choose the file you want to upload to YouTube and follow the instructions.
    5. Once your video is posted, turn in the link to the assignment and (possibly) discussion board.
    Instructions for students on recording a narrated slide presentation:
    1. Step-by-step text instructions to record narrated PowerPoint presentations
    2. Video instructions on narrated slide presentations (you can share the link with your students: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdeRJpIxCF0
  • OPTION 1: Put your Exam in iLearn

    NOTE:

    • If your final assignment can be submitted via iLearn, the impact will be minimal and you can proceed as planned.
    • Keep your original designated time slot (even though it has been moved online) for your final (see the schedule here).
    • For help using iLearn and more, see our schedule of live video training sessions.
    Once you are logged into your course in iLearn,
    1. Click "Assignments" (or you can create a new Content Area called “Final Exam” by click the "+" in the top left corner).
    2. Click "Assessments" and choose "Tests" from the dropdown menu.
    3. Choose "Create." This will take you to "Test Information" where you will give your test a title along with a description and instructions (optional).
    4. Click the "Submit" button on the bottom right of your screen. You are now in the "Test Canvas" where you will start creating your test questions.
      • Click "Create Questions" and choose the question type from the dropdown menu.
      • Click "Reuse Questions" to choose from the questions you've posted in any other assignment in this course
    5. When you have finished creating/importing your questions, you can edit the point totals for individual questions using the box to the right of the question, or you can "select all" or "select from category" to edit point totals in bulk.
    6. When you are ready to finalize the exam, click "OK" in the bottom right corner. Now you have created the test.
    7. To deploy (or publish for students) it, click on the title of the test you just created (in should appear in the "Add Test" box) and click the "Submit" button in the bottom right corner.
    8. This will bring up the "Test Options" page where you can control the instructions, availability, due dates, feedback, self-assessment and presentation of the test.
      • You must click “Yes” under Test Availability to "Make available to students" (here you can choose to send out an announcement when the test becomes available to students).
      • The "Force Completion" option will automatically submit the exam if the student loses their connection, so this is NOT recommended.
      • You can set a Timer (how long students have to take the test once they have started it).
      • Display allows you to decide when and how long the test link will be available to students.
      • Test Exceptions allows you tp set different dates and times for students who need accommodations.
      • In "Show Test Results and Feedback to Students" we recommend you choose "After attempts are graded" before correct answer are released to students (in case students need multiple attempts due to technological issues).
      • Test Presentation we recommend you choose “All at Once” and “Randomize Questions
    9. Click "Submit" in the bottom right corner and your exam is published.
    10. If you need to edit your exam or exam settings, click the dropdown arrow to the right of the exam title for edit options.

    For troubleshooting specific issues, submit a support request. For help using iLearn and more, see our schedule of live video training sessions.

     

    OPTION 2: Online Test Proctoring

     

    Due to the COVID-19 outbreak and multiple university closures, there is a rising demand for online proctoring solutions that may create an unusual strain on online proctoring service providers (e.g., ProctorU, Examity). The rising demand nationwide may result in a delay of service times over the next few weeks. For example, the creation of new instructor accounts by an online proctoring service can take up to 48-72 hours under normal, non-emergency conditions. Moreover, the current scheduling time for an online exam for a course, typically about three days after the initial request is made, may now be extended by an additional week or more. Furthermore, proctoring services incur a student “course materials” cost and students pay for exams delivered via online proctoring. Student costs can also increase through additional fees for late or urgent scheduling requests. Since additional course fees must be disclosed to students at the start of a term, we recommend not using an online proctoring service for your final exam unless the service provider and the student cost was already part of the course plan/syllabus from the start of the quarter.

    It is our recommendation that UCR faculty seek different final exam delivery solutions rather than utilizing an online proctoring service. We recommend that instructors consider how to deliver their final exams and tests using the iLearn online platform or provide an authentic alternative for a final exam, such as a final paper or a final presentation. If you adopt iLearn as your testing solution, there is no wait time to administer your final exam. Your students will not need to coordinate with a third party online proctoring service.


    There are many options for administering secure and timely exams using the iLearn platform, including:

    • Password protection
    • Question and/or answer randomization
    • Timed exams
    • Force completion for students who navigate away from the exam in their browsers
    • Display one question at a time and prohibiting backtracking

    Information and resources to help you plan and deliver a solid final assessment for your course are available at the Teaching @ UCR website, and instructors are encouraged to submit a BearHelp ticket with requests for assistance to address issues or problems you may encounter during finals week.

    Finally, If you still feel you need an online proctoring tools for your particular course needs, please submit service link ticket and requests will be taken into consideration on a case by case basis.

  • If you have not done so already, create a space in iLearn ("assignment" or separate "Content Area") for students to submit their final paper. Make sure to notify students of any formatting requirements or other instructions.

    To create an assignment in iLearn,

    1. Click "Assignment" from the right vertical menu.
    2. Click "Assessment" and then choose "Assignment" from the dropdown menu.
    3. In this "Create Assignment" page, you will title the assignment, provide instructions, attach any necessary documents, chose a due date, and designate the point value.
    4. Click the "Submit" button in the bottom right corner.
    5. To edit the assignment, click the arrow to the right of the assignment title.

 

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Summer Instructors

Webinars
The Art and Craft of Remote Teaching
Thursdays 2:00pm - 3:00pm | Fridays 10:00am-11:00am
 

The Art and Craft of Remote Teaching will empower faculty to utilize pedagogical ideas to enhance student/teacher connection, plan simple approaches to course design, and direct faculty to the related tools in the LMS for building instruction, assessment, and relationship within the course. A variety of topics will be covered, including, welcoming your students, creating instructor presence and student engagement, storytelling: building your course, and authentic assessments.

Webinar Topics are:

    • Week 1: Mapping Your Course Welcome, May 7 & 8
    • Week 2: Instructor Presence, May 14 & 15
    • Week 3: Storytelling; Building Your Course, May 21 & 22
    • Week 4: Authentic Assessments, May 28 & 29
    • Week 5: Final Review and Evaluation, June 4 & 5
Drop-in Sessions
Tuesdays and Fridays 1:00pm
 

Consultants are available during Drop-in Sessions to address your specific questions as you move through the course development process. We will demo Canvas for the first 30 minutes. Open discussion will follow.

Drop-in Demo topics are:

    • Week 3: Constructing Your Course Welcome and Presence, May 19 & 22
    • Week 4: Building Your Course Structure, May 26 & 29
    • Week 5: Creating Assignments and Assessments, June 2 & 5
    • The How to of the Canvas Gradebook, June 9 - 12

 

Webinar Recordings:
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Teaching Checklist for Teaching International Students Remotely

Download Checklist

The XCITE team acknowledges that obstacles can exist when teaching international students remotely. The team also recognizes that there can be many solutions to any challenges. In partnership with campus, XCITE strives to create innovative and impactful teaching and learning solutions that drive academic and inclusive excellence. Please consider the following challenges and solutions for supporting the success of UCR international students.

  • Internet and Research Access
    Lack of internet access, data "pay for usage" systems, and blockage of specific research topic

     

    Recommended Solutions:
    • Consider non-video forms of engagement, such as Slack or Google Docs
    • Install the GlobalConnect VPN prior to travel to a country with internet restrictions
    • Contact Kuei Chiu, kuei.chiu@ucr.edu, for library services and recommendations
  • Remote Exams
    UCR now offers two "do it yourself" remote proctoring solutions, YUJA and R' Proctoring. Both proctoring services are free to UCR students and faculty. You can choose the strategy (or combina- tion of strategies) that makes sense for you and your course.

     

    Recommended Solutions:
    • Review each service at /remote-proctoring
    • Contact XCITE-HELP@UCR.EDU if you want to discuss strategies
    • Consider offering an alternative type of assessment (e.g., blogging, student-led teaching, debate, student-led interviews with reports, presentations, exhibits, or student-produced digital assignments such as digital stories, blogging, or website)
    • Use your course management system to rotate questions and answers.
  • Help Students Keep Up with Course Load
    Students may be unfamiliar with the education format

     

    Recommended Solutions:
    • Clarify academic expectations of assessments and class participation
    • Provide clear instructions in multisensory formats (simplify the message without changing the material)
    • Share models of exemplar student work and substandard student work from past terms (excluding student information) as examples to clarify expectations.
    • Offer an outline that shows how to organize time. Prioritize and teach academic skills that are typical in Western contexts-expressing opinions, paraphrasing and summarizing; referencing; analysis, evaluation, and argument structure.
    • Allow students to demonstrate their knowledge, not just acknowledge it. For example, use presentations, essays, or digital stories.

     

    Pace and delivery: Speed of lecture is too fast

     

    Recommended Solutions:
    • When using recorded lectures, use technology that allows students to control the speed of delivery
    • Use YUJA to embed questions into video's so students can check their understanding Use YUJA close captioning feature, giving students the option to read or listen
    • Use visual aids such as pictures, diagrams, video, bullets, numbering, and highlighting Create consistent course designs (e.g., templates)
    • Post assignments, readings, and technical vocabulary ahead of time (e.g., at least two days before class) and provide sample assignments completed by past students to clarify content/format
  • Support Class Participation
    Students who have experienced an educational system that encourages memorization1 rather than active learning1 may not be comfortable expressing opinions or being critical about the content presented.

     

    Recommended Solutions:
    • Use Slack or threaded discussions to encourage students to break away from passively following the teacher's point of view, inviting the practice of constructive questioning or active self-expression
    • Use Poll Everywhere to seek student understanding of course concepts
    • Limit class presentations to small groups to accommodate cultural differences in presentation approaches
    • Assign groups using same time zones if there are expectations for group work
    • Clearly define discussion etiquette in ways that help international students feel like equal participants in the classroom setting
    • Allow students to contribute information from their country
    • Internationalize the course content and topics, the material with international perspectives, and activities that require interaction with students from diverse backgrounds
    • Model inclusive group work set guidelines and encourage strategies for students to offer peer support within the classroom. Encourage equal participation from domestic and international students.
  • Be Aware of International Student Well-being
    Many international students may feel isolated and homesick. International students may feel they are better supported and advised by relying on each other than on institution officials and class- mates.

     

    Recommended Solutions:
    • Increase and improve the interaction between professors and international students, forming positive student-teacher relationships, and building a level of trust that is a vital component to an inviting learning environment. For example, offer virtual office hours through ZOOM.
    • Create opportunities for international students to connect with other students (e.g., offer small discussion groups or use Slack).
    • Create opportunities for international students to connect with their family members. (Zoom, YUJA)
    • Offer international virtual game night to include domestic and international students. Ensure international students know about campus counseling services.
    Consider Cultural Differences

     

    Recommended Solutions:
    • Become informed about the international student culture, politics, and customs
    • Seek out cultural awareness training opportunities on campus
    • Lead a cross-campus or departmental training session
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