In-Person Instruction for Fall 2020

In-Person Instruction Proposal Form

Instructors of record requesting exceptional approval for in-person instruction must use the In-Person Instruction Proposal Form. Details, deadlines, and contact information for the proposal process are described in the form's introduction. Other college-specific guidelines should have been distributed to instructors of record via their cognizant chair/director. 

 APPLY HERE: In-Person Instruction Proposal Form

Before submitting the form, instructors of record must develop a plan for in-person instruction that upholds the requirements of the Instructional Continuity Plan, including remote accommodation for students who are unable or unwilling to attend in person. The information below will detail minimum requirements, recommendations, and opportunities for consultation for instructors who are developing remote options.

Developing a Remote Option Plan

Plans for in-person instruction must uphold the requirements of the Instructional Continuity Plan, including remote accommodation for students who are unable or unwilling to attend in person. Please read through the materials below to learn more about minimum requirements, recommendations, remote options, and consultation.

Minimum Requirements

  • Safety Policies: Your syllabus should clearly outline the policies for mask-wearing, the sanitizing of spaces/materials, and distancing during class. There should be clear instructions for a staggered entry/dismissal to maintain distance. Make sure to include the policies and requirements for the online students as well (e.g. webcams, software, exam proctoring instructions, etc.
  • Backup Plan: Develop a backup plan in case you are unable to keep teaching. If you test positive for the virus, is there someone able and willing to step in? If you have potentially exposed your students, there needs to be a plan in place for those in-person students who now must transition to online. 

Remote Accommodation Options

The following remote accommodation options and strategies are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Whatever strategy (or combination of strategies) you choose, be aware of the workload involved in developing a course wherein in-person and online students receive a quality course with a prepared instructor. 

  • Dual Mode Instruction
    • Dual Mode Instruction: Based on early teleconferencing courses, "dual mode instruction" requires the instructor to teach to both in-person students and students in a remote location at the same time. Teaching students in the room in front of you as well as those in the virtual space takes practice, technical expertise and the ability to shift from a physical to virtual presence. Keep in mind that UCR has some facilities to enable true dual mode instruction, but they are limited.
      • More Resources on Dual Mode Instruction 
        • Bertrand, Louise (04/30/2013). Cooperation between a Distance Teaching University and an On-Campus University: The Creation of a Dual-Mode University in Global challenges and perspectives in blended and distance learning (1-4666-3978-4, 978-1-4666-3978-2), (p. 115).
        • Elder, S. J. (2018). Multi-options: An innovative course delivery methodology. Nursing Education Perspectives, 39(2), 110-112.
        • King, Bruce (02/01/2012). Distance education and dual-mode universities: an Australian perspective. Open learning (0268-0513), 27 (1), p. 9.
        • Soesmanto T., & Bonner S. (2019). Dual mode delivery in an introductory statistics course: Design and evaluation. Journal of Statistics Education, 27(2), 90-98. 
        • Young, J. C. (2014). Dual-mode faculty: Attributions, affordances, and identity (Order No. 3636947). Available from ProQuest Central; ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. (1616588306).
  • HyFlex

    HyFlex: With this model, student engagement spans both in-person and online within the same structure and involves an integration of in-person and online pedagogy. Instructors will provide online students with some asynchronous content (e.g., recorded videos or lectures), but the quality must match what was provided to in-person students. Instructors must also offer opportunities for interaction and engagement for their online students. This will require a thoughtful course design.

  • Flipped Classroom

    Flipped Classroom: A course with a common lecture and multiple discussion sections may be “flipped” to deliver the lecture material remotely, while some discussion sections meet in person and others meet remotely. This approach also can accommodate situations in which some TAs do not want to teach in-person. Similarly, a course with multiple lecture sections may offer some sections in-person and others remote-only. In this case, instructors should work to synchronize the delivery of material and facilitate late add/drop requests across sections to accommodate changing student preferences.

  • Offer an Additional Course

    Offer an additional course: An additional instructor may offer a second course remote-only for students who cannot attend in person, provided the department/program will accept the course as a substitute for the in-person course. This approach is less flexible and would seem to require that students register and commit to one course or the other unless the instructors plan to facilitate late add/drop requests.

  • Adjust Requirements

    Adjust Requirements: A department/program may choose to waive certain in-person requirements.

  • Backup Plan

    Backup Plan: Develop a backup plan in case you are unable to keep teaching. If you test positive for the virus, is there someone able and willing to step in? If you have potentially exposed your students, there needs to be a plan in place for those in-person students who now must transition to online. 

  • Policies in Syllabus

    Policies in Syllabus: Your syllabus should clearly outline the policies for mask-wearing, the sanitizing of spaces/materials, and distancing during class. There should be clear instructions for a staggered entry/dismissal to maintain distance. Make sure to include the policies and requirements for the online students as well (e.g. webcams, software, exam proctoring instructions, etc.